Are Norwex consultants making real money?

Organic green products and MLM? Yeah, we’ve seen that before.

But Norwex does things a little differently.

The timing was impeccable for this company – they entered the market for chemical-free cleaning products in the mid-90s, during the revival of bohemian, bell bottom wearing hippies and the birth of the movement for all-natural, organic products.

Does this mean I’m involved?

This video explains everything:


Make sense? Either way, here’s the full review on Norwex.

Overview

Norwex is a Norwegian MLM founded in 1994 with the goal of providing homes with chemical-free cleaning products. Their mission is “Improving quality of life by radically reducing chemicals in our homes.”

Bjorn Nicolaisen founded the company after discovering a special microfiber cloth that was extremely effective at cleaning his windshield using nothing but water. He developed an entire list of household products that could effectively clean without using any chemicals, and Norwex was born.

Nicolaisen is a former attorney who has worked with the Norwegian Ministry of Environment and the General of Norway, so he knows his stuff. He’s currently still the Chairman of Norwex.

Norwex now has over 20,000 distributors, operates in Norway, Canada, the U.S., Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, and Australia.

How much does Norwex cost?
It costs $200 to join Norwex, and that includes a starter kit with product.

Registering for a consultant website, which is pretty much a requirements nowadays, is another $9-10/month.

In order to stay active, you need to sell $250 in product every 3 months. If you become inactive, you’ll be charged a fee to reactivate your account. After 12 months without sales, you’re no longer considered a consultant.

Products

Norwex is known as the chemical-free cleaning product company, although they’ve since expanded to offer personal care products as well.

Their flagship product is the microsilver cloth (also known as EnviroCloth), thespecial microfiber cleaning cloth that inspired Nicolaisen to start Norwex in the first place. These cloths are made of anti-bacterial fibers that attract dirt, grease, and dust, breaking down grime that would usually require chemicals to break down. The cloth also self-cleanses after 24 hours.

Cleaning and personal care products contain natural, botanical ingredients, replacing harmful chemicals with enzymes.

Production is mostly done at a production facility in China that the company opened in 2009.

For Your Home

These products include kitchen cleaning products, floor cleaning products, “home essentials”, and microfiber cloths.

To give you an idea of pricing, here are some home products:

  • EnviroCloth – $16.99 (best seller)
  • Ultra Power Plus Laundry Detergent – $24.99 (1kg)
  • Cleaning Paste – $29.99
  • Dishwashing Liquid – $9.99
  • Kitchen Towel & Cloth Set – $27.99
  • Produce Wash – $24.99

For Yourself

These products include bath and body care, personal care, and kids products.

To give you an idea of pricing, here are some examples of personal care products:

  • Cooling Mint Toothpaste – $15.99
  • Natural Deodorant Stick – $15.99
  • Organic Olive Oil Salt Scrub – $39.99
  • Hand Cream – $14.99
  • Bath Mat – $39.99
  • 4-in-1 Kids Wash – $19.99

Opportunity

This company still relies heavily on the home party model, which is ineffective at best, and a gag-worthy money pit that will cause you to lose all your friends at worst.

You MIGHT be able to recruit a few friends and family members to come to your home party in exchange for food (a la Tastefully Simple) or a free makeover (a la a million and one cosmetics MLMs), but even those are questionable. Reps eventually dry up their “warm market” of friends and family members who are tired of desperate sales pitches.

But getting your friends and family to come to a sales pitch/home party where they get to…watch you clean? Yeah, right. Dream on.

It’s just not a sustainable way to make money.

Even if you do manage to get some decent sales at your home parties, it won’t amount to a lot in profit. But you do get some free/discounted product.

  • Sell up to $249.99 in product and you get 8% of your sales in free product.
  • Sell $250-$749.99 in product and you get 10% of your sales in free product.
  • Sell $750 or more and you get 12% of your sales in free product.

You also get a free window cloth for each party you book.

Consultants earn 35% commission on their personal sales.

Let’s look at an example. Say you manage to get a huge group of people together, and they’re all super stoked about cleaning products and ready to open up those checkbooks. Your pitch is on point, and you make a whopping $1,000 in sales.

Keep in mind how difficult this is to do. Their products range from around $10-$40, so you’d have to sell a LOT of microfiber cloths and dishwashing liquid to hit those numbers. Like 50 products. Even with 10 people, that’s 5 products per person… and it’s not easy to get people to give up their Saturday afternoon to come over and listen to you give a sales pitch, so 10 people is being generous. Not to mention, selling 5 products per person is an unrealistic goal, considering you’re lucky if everyone in attendance buys one product.

But let’s just say you really hit it big this time. $1,000 in sales would net you $350 in commission, $120 in free product, and a free window cloth.

This isn’t bad, but it’s nothing outstanding. If you can replicate this once a week, you’d be earning just above minimum wage. But replicating those kinds of numbers at your home parties on a regular basis isn’t sustainable – ultimately, you run out of friends and family to invite, and people don’t need to buy new dish rags every week.

Like all MLMs, the real money is in your referral commissions. With Norwex, you earn commission on the sales of everyone you recruit, and the people they recruit, and the people they recruit, and so on. The higher you move up in rank, the more levels you unlock in your downline, the more you earn in referral commissions. But recruiting a massive downline and moving up in rank is not easy.

Recap

Their products are generally well-reviewed, and their mission is great. The company has been around for a while and doesn’t seem to be going anywhere.

However, you’re not going to be making much money (if any) from selling them.

You need to be very skilled in marketing and sales and especially in networking to make real money, as you’re going to need to have a huge group of friends and acquaintances who trust you and would be interested in joining your MLM. Most people simply end up losing friends, because no one wants to be asked once a week to join a “business opportunity” that costs money instead of generating it.

Networks dry up fast in this industry. Real fast.

But if it’s financial freedom you seek and you like automated ways to build passive income, there are better ways.

(and you can trash those old MLM habits, too)

Meet the Author

Jeremy Page

Jeremy Page teaches network marketers (company cheerleaders) how to build a real business. Far from a hater, he still LOLs at 3-way calls and building "downlines". If you like Monday morning conversations with your kids by the pool, you might like this.

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